Training senior adults. My methods surpass new studies.

Training senior adults

Last week I came across a new study by researchers at Wake Forest University. I had to read it twice to actually believe it, and a couple of times again before writing this post.

I´ve highlighted the “shocking” results so we can go straight to the point:

This is what Glenda achieved in 12 weeks, not 18 months! If you permit me, I think the training period time is the first achievement. Who wants to wait 18 months to see results? I´d love to know you if that´s so!

Glenda lost 11 pounds in 12 weeks, compared to 17 pounds in 18 months achieved by the study participants. 

Also, she gained 8,4 pounds of lean muscle, compared to 20% muscle mass loss in the study.

Side note, the weekly comments Glenda were doing each week in the measurement table were priceless.

These are the data that I can present to you, the conclusions are yours.

10 thoughts on “Training senior adults. My methods surpass new studies.”

      1. I know ! But with those series on tv of severe obese people losing weight, and a perfectly normal side effect with such tremendous weight loss to have loose skin at the end of the program, I think it shocks people and make them a bit scared? Just the other day someone told me it to be the reason, she wanted to loose weight slowly. Having to loose 150 kilo or 20 kilo, somehow some people don’t understand that is a huge difference.

      2. There is a huge difference between 20 and 150 kilo, if they don’t notice it… well, they may need math classes, lol!!
        Anyway, the tv shows are a different thing, there is a competition to lose more weight than the other participants, and their health get aside. I would blame the trainers for that, and that kind of tv shows should not exist (but that’s my opinion).
        1 or 2 pounds per week shouldn’t result into loosen skin. But if you stick to what is safe for anyone and you can anticipate that all the participants are going to lose 1-2 pounds per week… Bye-bye tv shows 😃

  1. Proper eating habits will help reduce muscle loss as well, which I believe you offer nutritional support as well as the physical training. Good job Glenda!!

    1. Yes, I do. Training and meal plans have to work together to get the best results. What I do not know is what this people exactly did in Wake Forest, lol!! But 20% muscle loss doing weight training? Someone didn’t calculate the protein needs correctly 😂😂

      1. Indeed lol!!! I read an article a few month ago about muscle loss in the senior population and how adequate protein is vital. I don’t remember who publish it but weight training certain should be included on a regular basis.

      2. Yeah, muscle loss is a common issue as we age. On the other hand, weight training is an undeniable way to build muscle, but only if you eat enough protein (at any age). So, I can only think that they could get better results with a different diet. Maybe in a future research?? Lol!!!

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Lower Leg

The gastrocnemius and the soleus form what we know as calf. They are involved in activities such as walking, running, jumping… 

Hamstrings

A hamstring is any one of the three posterior thigh muscles in between the hip and the knee (from medial to lateral: semimembranosus, semitendinosus and biceps femoris). The hamstrings are quite susceptible to injury.

Quadriceps

The Quadriceps Femoris is the knee extensor muscle.  As a group, the quadriceps femoris is crucial in walking, running, jumping and squatting. It´s subdivided into four separate “heads”.

Glutes

The gluteal muscles are a group of three muscles which make up the buttocks: the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and gluteus minimus. The three muscles originate from the ilium and sacrum and insert on the femur. The functions of the muscles include extension, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation of the hip joint.

Lower Back

The Erector Spinae is not just one muscle, but a bundle of muscles and tendons. Paired, they run more or less vertically. It extends throughout the lumbar, thoracic and cervical regions, and lies in the groove to the side of the vertebral column.

Obliques

The External Oblique is situated on the lateral and anterior parts of the abdomen. It is broad, thin, and irregularly quadrilateral. It is the largest and the most superficial (outermost) of the three flat muscles of the lateral anterior abdomen. 

Abs

The Rectus Abdominis is the most superficial of the abdominal muscles. It is this muscle which forms the six-pack shape! It is a paired muscle running vertically on each side of the anterior wall of the abdomen. There are two parallel muscles, separated by a midline band of connective tissue called the linea alba.

Pecs

The pectoralis major makes up the bulk of the chest muscles in the male and lies under the breast in the female.

The pectoralis minor is a thin, triangular muscle, situated at the upper part of the chest, beneath the pectoralis major. 

Forearm
(Posterior muscles)

The Extensor Digitorum muscle helps in the movements of the wrists and the elbows. It extends the phalanges, then the wrist, and finally the elbow. It acts principally on the proximal phalanges. It tends to separate the fingers as it extends them.

Forearm
(Anterior muscles)

The Pronator teres pronates the forearm, turning the hand posteriorly. If the elbow is flexed to a right angle, then pronator teres will turn the hand so that the palm faces inferiorly. It is assisted in this action by pronator quadratus.

Triceps

The Triceps Brachii muscles  have three muscle heads: Lateral, Medial and Long head. Primarily responsible for the extension of the elbow joint. The lateral head is used for movements requiring occasional high-intensity force, while the medial fascicle enables more precise, low-force movements.

Biceps

The Biceps brachii is  actually two separate bundles of muscles (heads). The two heads of the Biceps vary in length and as a result, are called the Short and the Long Biceps heads.

Infraspinatus

The Infraspinatus muscle is one of the four rotator cuff muscles crossing the shoulder joint and is commonly injured. It is the main external rotator of the shoulder joint.

Deltoids

The Deltoid muscle is the muscle forming the rounded contour of the shoulder. It is divided into three portions, anterior, lateral and posterior, with the fibers having different roles due to their orientation.

Latissimus Dorsi

The latissimus dorsi is the larger, flat, dorsolateral muscle on the trunk, posterior to the arm, and partly covered by the trapezius on its median dorsal region.

Trapezius

The trapezius is a broad, flat and triangular muscle. The muscles on each side form a trapezoid shape. It is the most superficial of all the back muscles.

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