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Best Swimming Workout to Lose Fat

Now that we are enjoying the summer, it is hot and what we most want to do is dive into the water, Eva Forde brings us the best swimming training to lose fat:

One of the best ways to look great in a swimsuit is to slip into one for your workout. Swimming is by far one of the optimal types of exercise. Not only does it provide you with resistance you can work against to build more muscle and burn more fat, but it is low-impact, so any one of any age and any fitness level can do it.

Of course, you’re not going to lose much weight just dog paddling around the pool. If you want to lose serious fat, you need to slip into your best sports swim suit and ignite your fat burning engines. To do this, you need to tap into your anabolic system: that system that fuels your body without the presence of oxygen. Instead, you draw on your glucose and glycogen to fuel your movement. The result? You use existing energy stores instead of O2, and you burn more fat.

So, the question remains, how do you get an anaerobic swimming workout?

Read on to find out!

Interval training!

Interval training uses short, intense bursts of energy followed by a short period of active recovery (minimal intensity) to maximize your workout, and increase your fat burning gains. When you’re pushing yourself through those intense bursts, you’re working in your anaerobic zone, and you need to be pushing yourself to your limit. Remember: you won’t be doing it for long! You continue to cycle back and forth between your working sets and your active recovery sets until your time’s up.

Photo credit: https://www.pexels.com/photo/person-swimming-on-body-of-water-863988/

When is your time up?

That’s the other good news: when you interval train, you don’t have to workout for long. As little as 20 minutes can give you better long-term metabolic health than an hour on the treadmill.

Sounds great, right?

Of course it does. So suit up! Here’s your fat-blasting swimming workout.

You’re going to do this workout in a circuit. Start with exercise #1 and then move to #5. Cycle through the circuit 3-5 times, depending on your current fitness level, and then call it a day.

Photo credit: https://www.pexels.com/photo/water-swimming-competition-pool-56837/
  • Exercise 1: Front Crawl at maximum intensity — 1 minute. Treadwater or jog on spot in pool for 20 seconds.
  • Exercise 2: Butterfly at maximum intensity — 1 minute. Treadwater or jog on spot in pool for 20 seconds.
  • Exercise 3: Back crawl at maximum intensity — 1 minute. Treadwater or jog on spot in pool for 20 seconds.
  • Exercise 4: Flutter kick at maximum intensity — 1 minute. Treadwater or jog on spot in pool for 20 seconds.
  • Exercise 5: Reverse flutter kick at maximum intensity  — 1 minute. Treadwater or jog on spot in pool for 20 seconds.

A note on maximum intensity…

For this short and sweet workout to burn the fat and build the muscle that will keep your fat burning engines revved, you need to work hard. Super hard. On a scale of 1 – 10, with 1 being lying on the couch doing nothing and 10 being working so hard you’re ready to vomit, you need to be working at a 9. This is the only way you’re going to see the results you’re working toward.

Eva Forde

Eva Forde

Eva Forde is a dedicated and passionate freelance lifestyle blogger. She blogs over at evafordebeauty.blogspot.com about Fitness and Fashion.

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How Getting Active and Healthy Keeps You Strong in Addiction Recovery by Constance Ray

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle with a regular fitness routine does more than create visible results. Physical fitness transforms your body, inside and out, which means it’s also one of the best things you can do to facilitate addiction recovery. When you’re in recovery, creating a new life without substances involves caring for your body, mind, and soul. All of these parts of you are affected by addiction, so caring for your whole self is necessary to stay clean and sober.

How Does Being Active Help You Succeed in Recovery?

On a physical level, doing an aerobic activity that increases your heart rate changes your brain chemistry by releasing the natural feel-good chemicals called endorphins. Sometimes called a “runner’s high,” this physiological effect of exercise is an incredible mood boost. When someone is addicted, they depend on substances to get that feel-good effect, but in recovery, exercise gives your brain that same reward in a much healthier way. This may be one reason why developing a regular exercise routine helps many people in recovery manage cravings because the activity replaces the desire to use to a substance.

In addition to giving you a mood boost, physical fitness also reduces stress, making it a great coping skill for managing stressors and triggers when you’re in recovery. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, exercise decreases tension, helps you sleep better, and builds self-esteem. Dealing with stress can zap your energy, but exercise gives you back the energy your body needs to make managing stress easier. Physical fitness also makes you feel good about yourself. Whether you’re just starting your first workout or you see yourself achieving your fitness goals, getting stronger is a huge accomplishment. Gaining this self-confidence builds your belief that you are capable of staying clean and sober by showing you that you have the ability to overcome challenges.

What Is the Best Type of Exercise for Recovery?

Any exercise will make you healthier, and the best exercise is something you enjoy and can commit to doing regularly. However, some types of exercise maximize the positive impacts that benefit recovery. Aerobic exercise like running gets your heart rate up to release those endorphins, and the repetitive nature of running is also meditative, which helps decrease stress and refocus your mind in a positive way. Swimming is another exercise that has the same meditative quality, and moving through water is also very relaxing. According to the Huffington Post, many people in recovery find that yoga helps them practice mindfulness. Mindfulness is a powerful tool that builds awareness and self-reflection so you gain a better understanding of your habits and your choices.

How Do You Maintain a Healthy Routine for the Long Term?

The key to making both physical fitness and recovery stick long term is integrating an overall healthy lifestyle into your regular routine. You won’t get the same benefit from hitting the gym only once in a while. But when you schedule and commit to workouts as part of your daily life, it can help structure your day so that you aren’t as tempted to use drugs or alcohol. If you struggle with how to make this commitment, try different types of exercise to find something that is fulfilling for you and works with your schedule. Making good nutrition and self-care part of your wellness lifestyle will also support your fitness goals and make it easier to keep them. The great thing about starting these habits is that when you take better care of your body, you feel better about yourself, which motivates you to keep going.

The hardest part is getting started. Once you do, maintaining a healthy lifestyle gets easier as this positive cycle becomes a way of life. Creating this new way of life makes you stronger—physically, mentally, and even spiritually—for staying on the right track in recovery.

Photo credit: Pexels

Constance Ray

Constance Ray

Constance Ray started Recoverywell.org with the goal of creating a safe place for people to share how addiction has affected them, whether they are combating it themselves or watching someone they care about work to overcome it. The goal is to share stories of hope from survivors who know that the fight against addiction is one worth having, because no matter how it affects you, life can get better.

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Multipurpose pool

A swimming pool is not only for swimming. We can perform several exercises into the water with great benefits. But it is not as simple as pay the ticket and swim. According to our injuries or goals, some exercises are recommended while others are forbidden.

Water offers more resistance than air. At the same time, compress our joints and push up our body, feeling lighter (we don´t lose weight, but it feels like it for our joints).

Walking in the swimming pool is a great exercise to lose weight. Do your joints hurt when walking or running, but you need to lose weight? Try to walk in the swimming pool, instead your “dry” walkings and let me know :)

I found this video where a friendly chiropractic explains some exercises targeting our low back. The best thing we can do if we have an injury is approach and explain it to the monitor/trainer/coach. Ask! Usually, we don´t bite :)