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Top 10 High-Fiber Foods

Top 10 High-Fiber Foods
Fiber is a form of carbohydrate found in plants that humans lack the enzyme to digest. It helps us feel fuller on fewer calories, keeps things moving through the gastrointestinal tract, can help support cardiovascular health, and can help support healthy blood sugar levels by slowing the absorption of sugar after a meal.
 
If you’re looking for a simpler way to slim down and improve your health, eating more fiber may help you get there.
 
Without fiber, the digestive tract suffers and people may develop high cholesterol that could lead to heart disease.
 
So, the question is, are you getting enough fiber?
 
The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that women ages 19–50 get from 25–28 grams of fiber daily; men ages 19–50 should aim for 30–34 grams daily. Due to today’s lacking Western diet, it is estimated that less than 5% of population get the recommended amount of dietary fiber each day.
 
All of the foods listed below are not just foods with the highest fiber content, but essential nutrients that help our bodies thrive.

Flaxseeds

Total dietary fiber: 2.8 grams of fiber per tablespoon of whole flaxseeds (10 grams) 
Essential nutrients: Protein, thiamine, manganese, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, omega-3 fatty acids

Chia Seeds

Total dietary fiber: 10.6 grams per ounce (28 grams)
Essential nutrients: Protein, calcium, phosphorus, manganese, omega-3 fatty acids, omega-6 fatty acids

Coconut

Total dietary fiber: 7.2 grams per cup (80 grams)
Essential nutrients: Manganese, omega-6 fatty acids, folate, selenium

Almonds

Total dietary fiber: 11.6 grams of fiber per cup (95 grams)
Essential nutrients: Protein, vitamin E, manganese, magnesium, riboflavin, omega-6 fatty acids

Artichokes

Total dietary fiber: 10.3 grams of fiber per medium artichoke (120 grams)
Essential nutrients: Vitamins A, C, E, B, K; potassium; calcium; magnesium; phosphorous

Raspberries

Total dietary fiber: 8 grams of fiber per cup (123 grams)
Essential nutrients: Vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, folate

Avocados

Total dietary fiber: 10.1 grams per cup (150 grams) 
Essential nutrients: Vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin K, potassium

Peas

Total dietary fiber: 8.8 grams per cooked cup (160 grams)
Essential nutrients: Vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin B6, thiamine, manganese, folate, vitamin A, protein

Chickpeas

Total dietary fiber: 12.5 grams of fiber per cup (164 grams)
Essential nutrients: Protein, copper, folate, manganese, omega-6 fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids

Lentils

Total dietary fiber: 15.6 grams of fiber per cup (198 grams)
Essential nutrients: Protein, iron, folate, manganese, phosphorous

Now, I´d love to know: How do you plan to combine these foods to get the fiber you need daily?

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30 healthy chickpeas recipes

30 healthy Chickpeas recipes

Chickpeas, also called garbanzo beans, are one of the oldest consumed crops in the world and remain one of the most popular today across nearly every continent. Chickpeas have been a part of certain traditional diets for over 7,500 years!

Chickpeas are a type of legume that offer a range of health benefits. Chickpeas help to

  • increase satiety,
  • boost digestion,
  • keep blood sugar levels stable,
  • increase protection against disease
  • provides essential vitamins and minerals.

Increases Satiety and Helps with Weight Loss

Chickpeas are high in both protein and fiber, which helps to make you feel full and to curb food cravings and unhealthy snacking. Studies have shown that consuming fiber is correlated with having a lower body weight.

Chickpeas give us a feeling of being full after eating, while also helping to control our blood sugar levels and therefore maintaining our energy.

Improves Digestion

Chickpeas make my list for the 20 Ultimate High Fiber Foods, with roughly 6-7 grams per half cup serving. 

Fiber facilitates in healthy digestion by quickly moving foods through the digestive tract, helping to decrease symptoms of IBS and constipation. Fiber works by drawing fluids from the body and binding them to the bulk of forming stool, which contains toxins and waste that must be removed from the body.

The high amount of fiber in garbanzo beans is responsible for its filling effect and helps to improve digestion, but it does much more than this. Fiber aids in heart health, helps to control blood sugar levels, guards against cancer, heart disease, diverticulosis, kidney stones, PMS, obesity, and more.

Helps Control Blood Sugar Levels

Chickpeas nutrition includes starch, which is a slow burning carbohydrate that the body does not react to by suddenly spiking glucose in the blood.

Unlike simple sugars- found in processed products like refined flour, white bread and pasta, soda, candy, and most other packaged foods- the starches found in chickpeas take an extended period of time to break down once consumed.

Starches contain natural sugars called glucose, which the body uses easily for many essential functions, however glucose can be troublesome for people who are pre-diabetic or who have diabetes. The process of digesting and utilizing the glucose found in all beans and starches is drawn-out, which is extremely important for diabetics who have trouble reaching a stable blood sugar level after contain sugars due to a resistance to insulin.

Helps Protect Against Heart Disease

Chickpeas have been shown to help balance unhealthy cholesterol levels, to reduce hypertension, and to protect against heart disease in multiple ways. Fiber works to create a gel-like substance in the digestive system that binds with fatty acids, helping to balance cholesterol levels. Both soluble fiber and insoluble fiber have been show to be important in helping to control and manage hypertension.

Beans help to keep the arteries clear from plaque build-up, maintain healthy blood pressure levels, and decrease the chances of cardiac arrest and stroke. In fact studies show that having just one daily serving (about 3/4 cup cooked) of beans of any kind can help to decrease chances of a heart attack and to help balance “bad” LDL cholesterol.

Provides Essential Vitamins and Minerals

Chickpeas nutrition boasts high levels of iron, zinc, folate, phosphorus, vitamin K, and B vitamins, all of which are especially important for vegetarians and vegans who may be lacking in these essential nutrients due to avoiding animal products. Chickpeas are great source of folate, also called Vitamin B6. Folate is important for helping the body to effectively produce new cells as it plays a role in copying and synthesizing DNA. A deficiency in folate can contribute to anemia, poor immune function, and poor digestion; and for pregnant women, a deficiency can lead to neural tube defects such as spina bifida.

Though phosphate and calcium are both important in bone structure, the careful balance of the two minerals is necessary for proper bone mineralization – consumption of too much phosphorus with too little calcium intake can result in bone loss.

Chickpeas nutrition also includes zinc. Zinc is an essential trace mineral that plays a role in over 100 important enzymatic reactions in the body. Zinc facilitates in bodily functions including protecting against free radical damage (also called oxidative damage), helps speed up wound healing, plays a part in the copying of DNA, and helps with the formation of hemoglobin within the blood. A deficiency can include frequently getting sick with colds, leaky gut syndrome, consistent digestive problems like diarrhea, poor eye health, infertility, thinning hair, and even stunted growth in children.

Adequate vitamin K consumption is important for good bone health because it improves calcium absorption and may reduce urinary excretion of calcium, making sure that enough calcium is available for building and repairing bone. Low intake of vitamin K is associated with a higher risk for bone fracture.

30-Day Meal Plan

A good health starts in the kitchen
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Top 100 Fitness Blogs and Websites on the planet

Top 100 fitness blogs on the planet

TOP 100 FITNESS BLOGS ON THE PLANET

I am so excited by this news that my hands tremble!!! Where do I begin? At the beginning, you are right.

As you know, the fitness industry is hard and publicizing an internet business is possibly even harder. For these reasons, I am always looking for ways to promote my business. Last weekend, I found the list of the best 100 blogs and websites to follow, provided by Feedspot.

What´s Feedspot? It´s a RSS Reader. If you’re trying to keep up with news and content on multiple webs, Feedspot allows you to put all of your reading in one place.

There is an impressive amount of fitness blogs out there and this list includes the best on the planet like Men´s Fitness, Reebok Fitness Blog, MyFitnessPal Blog, ACE (American Council on Exercise), or Anytime Fitness Blog, just to name a few blogs among the top 10.

Call me foolish, but I decided to submit my blog, with little or no hope of accessing the list. I would be happy to enter the Feedspot fitness blog directory and get some more readers. That´s what I expected. What I got, so you can guess by the title of this post, was to enter the list. I am not in the position #100, or #99, not even #90 or #80. Dear friends, my blog is on the list at number 73, which is not bad if you realize that I do not have a team working on this blog. Just me!

Chape Fitness best fitness blog on the planet

I am so happy and proud right now… that I´m going  to take  the rest of the day off!! I think you will agree with me… From time to time a break is necessary to savor the achievements and victories. This news is both an achievement and a sweet victory after a long time blogging. 

Don´t worry, I will return with new content and much more energy before you realize that I have taken a day off, I promise.

I’m looking forward to climbing some positions. I know I will never make #1 but, top 50? I´m going to try it.

From a small Spanish coastal town to the top 100 fitness blogs on the planet, today is a day to remember and celebrate!

Thank you all, lot of love and, as always, big hugs!!

David.

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30 healthy quinoa recipes

Quinoa recipes

Quinoa is a grain crop that is grown for its edible seeds. It technically isn’t a cereal grain, but a pseudo-cereal. In other words, it is basically a “seed” which is prepared and eaten similarly to a grain.

Quinoa was an important crop for the Inca Empire back in the day. They referred to it as the “mother of all grains” because the Incas believed it increased the stamina of their warriors.

Here are sone health benefits of quinoa:

Protein rich

It is one of the most protein-rich foods we can eat. It is a complete protein containing all nine essential amino acids.

Control diabetes

Contains almost twice as much fiber as most other grains. Fiber helps to prevent heart disease by reducing high blood pressure and diabetes, lowers cholesterol and glucose levels,  and may help you to lose weight because it makes you feel fuller for longer and is less “energy dense” which means it has fewer calories for the same volume of food.

Boost circulation

Contains Iron, which helps keep our red blood cells healthy and is the basis of hemoglobin formation. Iron carries oxygen from one cell to another and supplies oxygen to our muscles to aid in their contraction. It also increases brain function because the brain takes in about 20% of our blood oxygen. 

Tissue growth and repair

Contains lysine, essential for tissue growth and repair.

Lower blood pressure

It is rich in magnesium. Helps to relax blood vessels and thereby to alleviate migraines. Magnesium also may reduce Type 2 diabetes by promoting healthy blood sugar control. 

Increases energy

High in Riboflavin (B2). B2 improves energy metabolism within brain and muscle cells and is known to help create proper energy production in cells.

Antioxidant

Quinoa has a high content of manganese, an antioxidant, which helps to prevent damage of mitochondria during energy production as well as to protect red blood cells and other cells from injury by free radicals.

30-Day Custom meal Plan

Good health and a fit body start in the kitchen
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30 healthy kidney beans recipes

Kidney beans recipes

Let me share with you some healthy kidney beans recipes. True to their name, these beans are kidney shaped. They are especially good in simmered dishes where they absorb the flavors of seasonings and other foods with which they are cooked.

The most notable health benefits of kidney beans include:
  • their ability to detoxify the body,
  • improve digestion,
  • lower blood pressure,
  • lower cholesterol levels,
  • increase muscle mass,
  • prevent diabetes,
  • boost circulation,
  • stimulate the immune system,
  • aid vision health,
  • promote strong bones,
  • support energy levels and
  • strengthen cognitive health, among others.

Control Diabetes

Their high level of dietary fiber is great for people looking to control their diabetes or lower its risk. High-fiber foods regulate the amount of blood sugar and insulin, helping to reduce the dangers of spikes and drops in glucose, and stabilize energy levels.

Lower Cholesterol Levels

Another major benefit is their ability to lower LDL cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of coronary heart diseases. Kidney beans can help lower your chances of developing atherosclerosis and suffering a heart attack.

Promote Muscle Growth

Kidney beans are one of the best sources of plant protein. A single cup offers nearly 15 grams of protein. Lean protein breaks down into crucial amino acids that are used for energy production and the growth of muscle tissue, so if you are trying to bulk up and burn fat, kidney beans are an excellent option.

Boost Immune System

Kidney beans contain more than 10% of your daily recommendation of vitamin C in each cup. This can stimulate the immune system and promote the production of white blood cells, first line of defense against foreign pathogens. It is also critical for collagen production, and thus helps repair processes throughout the body.

Eye Care

Boasting a high level of beta-carotene, which breaks down into vitamin A, kidney beans are known for their impact on vision health

Lower Blood Pressure

1 cup of kidney beans holds 20% of your daily recommended amount of potassium, a vasodilator that can boost heart health. Potassium helps to lower the risk of heart attack, stroke and coronary heart disease.

Boost Circulation

Kidney beans provide more than 20% of your daily recommended amount of iron. Iron is a key component in the production of red blood cells. A diet high in kidney beans will boost circulation and cardiovascular health. Also increasing energy levels and delivering oxygen to extremities and areas of the body that need resources the most.

Increase Bone Mineral Density

The list of minerals found in kidney beans includes phosphorus, magnesium, copper and manganese. All of them play a role in bone mineral density. Increasing your mineral uptake will lower your risk of developing osteoporosis, keeping you strong and active as you age.

Stimulate Energy Production

Manganese plays dozens of key roles in the body, including the production of enzymes that are involved in energy production and mitochondrial function. This means more accessible energy in the body if you add these beans to your daily or weekly diet.

Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

Neurodegenerative diseases come in many forms, but when it comes to preventing memory loss, thiamin has been heavily researched. Kidney beans possess high levels of this vitamin (B1), making it an ally for people as they age. Particularly, if they are at risk of cognitive decline or suffer from high levels of oxidative stress.

Improve Digestion

The most well-known health benefit of kidney beans is the impact it can have on digestion. Dietary fiber stimulates the production of gastric juices and promotes peristaltic motion, which keeps the bowels moving normally. Regular consumption can help prevent symptoms of constipation and bloating, while also lowering your risk of hemorrhoids and ulcers.

30-Day Custom Meal Plan

A meal plan is ideal for someone who understands the importance of nutrition and already makes good nutrition sources but needs help dialing the process in. A meal plan provides a customized schedule for calories, macronutrients, and meals.
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Not all calories were created equal

How many of you have been told that if you burn more calories than you eat, weight loss will be inevitable? How many of you have discovered that this advice does not seem to apply to you no matter how hard you try?

Then you think, “I must be doing something wrong, I’ll exercise more and I’ll eat fewer calories than I already am, that should work!” Unfortunately, more often than not it doesn’t.

You might think that a calorie is a calorie. But the way the body breaks down carbohydrates, protein and fat, and the effect they have on our bodies differ vastly. Instead of just counting calories, you should take care where these calories come from. The source of the calorie changes how you digest it and how you retrieve energy from it.  Even more important is the fact that different foods and macronutrients have a major effect on the hormones and brain centers that control hunger and eating behavior. The foods we eat can have a huge impact on the biological processes that govern when, what, and how much we eat.

Selection of food for weight loss

Protein

Protein keeps us feeling fuller for longer by slowing digestion, but its primary role in the body is to maintain and build new cells, growing and adding new tissues. Protein is beneficial for weight loss, as it contributes to satiety and offsets the amount of lean muscle that is burned for energy, in addition to fat, during a calorie deficit.

Proteins provide about 4 calories per gram but there are higher quality proteins, which may reduce appetite and optimize muscle repair and recovery (fish or eggs), and lower quality proteins (hamburger meat) that are loaded with branched-chain amino acids, which have been linked to metabolic disease and insulin resistance.

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are by far the most complex because our bodies use the different types of carbohydrates (such as fiber, starch, and sugar) in very different ways. Carbohydrates are used by the body as a quick source of energy, particularly for the brain, liver, and muscles.

All carbohydrates provide 4 calories per gram (with the exception of fiber, which our body can’t digest). Though not a source of calories, fiber is considered a high-quality carbohydrate since it slows digestion and moderates the absorption of other nutrients, like sugar. For this reason, high-quality carbohydrates typically contain fiber and are minimally processed. These include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes. Lower-quality carbohydrates almost always lack fiber and add little more than “empty calories” to our diets.

Carbohydrates have been categorized as simple or complex in the past but many doctors are pulling away from those narrow categories and moving toward glycemic index. An apple is a simple carbohydrate because it is digested quickly by the body, but the fruit is better for you than other simple carbohydrates like chips or crackers. That’s why the glycemic index as a more accurate measure of a food’s value (good or bad). When something has a low glycemic index, it raises your blood sugar levels slowly, increasing your insulin levels gradually.

Apple 600

Focus on low-glycemic foods like whole-grain pasta, wheat bread, fruits, beans, and nuts. High-glycemic foods include candy, croissants, and scones. By choosing the low-glycemic foods and thus the minimally processed foods, people can lose more weight, feel fuller longer, and remain healthier.

Let’s take it a step further and compare calories from two different types of sugar: glucose and fructose.

Starchy foods like rice, potatoes, and pasta are predominantly made up of glucose, a simple sugar that can be burned for energy by every cell in our bodies. It’s stored in our liver and muscles for a quick source of energy during exercise or while we sleep. Unprocessed starchy foods, like brown rice, potatoes with the skin on and whole-wheat pasta, contain the food’s natural fiber as well as some vitamins and minerals.

Fructose can only be broken down in the liver. It’s also the sweetest tasting of the three simple sugars. In nature, fructose is found in fruits bound tightly to indigestible fiber that, as we already know, reduces and slows its absorption. Unfortunately, the majority of fructose in our diets isn’t from fruits (it’s from calorie-containing sweeteners added to sweetened beverages and the majority of processed foods). Fruits also have fiber, water, and significant chewing resistance, which mitigate the negative effects of the fructose. So, try to change these processed foods for real fruits.

Calories in fruits [Convertido]

 

 

Fats

In addition to being a potent and flavorful source of energy, fats slow digestion, deliver important fat-soluble vitamins to the body, and provide important building blocks for every one of our cells.

All dietary fats provide about 9 calories per gram but some fats are better for our health than others. For example, polyunsaturated omega-3 fats, found in foods like wild salmon and flaxseed, have protective, anti-inflammatory properties, whereas artificial trans fats have been linked to increased inflammation and heart disease.

A study funded by the Sugar Research Foundation (SRF) from the 1960s found that cholesterol and fat were the main contributors to weight gain and responsible for an increased risk for coronary heart disease. With fat removed, food lost taste and appeal, so manufacturers added sugar to combat this. The intake of sugar and processed carbohydrates went up, while our intake of fat went down. Dr. David Ludwig, a professor in the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, says “Overall, these processed carbohydrates are worse than the fats they replaced.

Also, very-low-fat diets may actually slow a person’s metabolism down to a level where it is not burning calories as effectively as it could, says researcher David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD, who directs the Optimal Weight for Life program at the Harvard-affiliated Children’s Hospital in Boston.

The thermic effect of food

The thermic effect of food is a measure of how much different foods increase energy expenditure, due to the energy required to digest, absorb and metabolize the nutrients. Different foods go through different metabolic pathways. The more efficient a metabolic pathway is, the more of the food energy is used for work and less is dissipated as heat.

The metabolic pathways for protein are less efficient than the metabolic pathways for carbs and fat. A large part of the protein calories is lost as heat when it is metabolized by the body. This is the thermic effect of different macronutrients:

  • Fat: 2-3%
  • Carbs: 6-8%
  • Protein: 25-30%

If we go with a thermic effect of 25% for protein and 2% for fat, this would mean that a 100 calories of protein would end up as 75 calories, while a 100 calories of fat would end up as 98 calories. Studies show that high protein diets boost metabolism by 80 to 100 calories per day, compared to lower protein diets.

Put simply, high protein diets have a metabolic advantage. If people increase their protein intake, they start losing weight without counting calories or controlling portions. Protein puts fat loss on autopilot.

Ultimately, the quality of what we eat impacts not only our weight but also our overall health and well-being.  Counting calories alone doesn’t work because ultimately it matters where those calories come from; this matters more than the number of calories ingested.

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30 healthy lentil recipes

Lentils healthy recipes

Today I want to share some healthy lentils recipes. Compared to other types of dried beans, lentils are relatively quick and easy to prepare. They readily absorb a variety of wonderful flavors from other foods and seasonings, are high in nutritional value and are available throughout the year.

Lentils nutrition benefits include:

  • the ability to improve and maintain heart health,
  • help you to lose weight in a healthy way,
  • fight blood sugar fluctuations that can lead to diabetes or low energy levels,
  • improve digestive health. 

Lentils are enjoyed all over the world in many types of recipes and are one of the best all-natural meat-substitute foods.

Lower Cholesterol

Lentils help to reduce blood cholesterol since they contain high levels of soluble fiber. Lowering your cholesterol levels reduces your risk of heart disease and stroke by keeping your arteries clean.

Heart Health

Several studies have shown that high fiber foods reduce your risk of heart disease. Lentils are also a great source of folate and magnesium. Folate lowers your homocysteine levels, a serious risk factor for heart disease. Magnesium improves blood flow, oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. 

Digestive Health

Lentils contain insoluble dietary fiber which helps prevent constipation and other digestive disorders like irritable bowel syndrome and diverticulosis.

Stabilized Blood Sugar

Soluble fiber slows down digestion and stabilizes blood sugar levels. This can be especially helpful for those with diabetes, insulin resistance or hypoglycemia.

Good Protein

26% of lentil’s calories are attributed to protein, which makes them a wonderful source of protein for vegetarians and vegans.

Increases Energy

Lentils increase energy due its fiber and complex carbohydrates. Lentils contain high amount of iron, which is needed by the body for optimum hemoglobin production. About 36% of the iron of the Daily Recommended value can come from eating 1 cup (200 grams) of lentils every day. Iron deficiency is a common cause of fatigue.

Women aged 18 to 50 years are particularly susceptible to iron deficiency. Not getting enough iron in the diet can affect how efficiently the body uses energy.

Weight Loss

Although lentils include all these beneficial nutrients like fiber, protein, minerals and vitamins, they contain virtually no fat

 
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30 healthy tofu recipes

Tofu healthy recipes
Let´s share some healthy tofu recipes. Tofu has gained popularity over the years especially as a vegetarian and vegan approved source of protein. Tofu is made by curdling soy milk and then pressing the resulting curds into soft, white blocks. The process of making tofu is relatively similar to the way that cheese is made from milk. Tofu nutrition is impressive, and that’s why many people assume it’s such a great health food. Per serving, it’s low in fat and calories yet high in protein, amino acids, iron, and calcium.
The negative part of this story is that soy is actually one of the most commonly genetically modified foods in the world, and tofu is made from soybeans, water, and a coagulant, or curdling agent. The vast majority of soy consumed in the U.S. comes from a highly processed form of soy. The soybeans have usually been genetically engineered, cracked, dehulled, crushed, and subjected to solvent extraction to separate their oils from the rest of the bean.

The health benefits of tofu include:

  • helps lower cholesterol levels,
  • prevent anemia and
  • manage weight, among others.

Maintains Cardiovascular Health

Regular consumption of soy products like tofu may lower  cholesterol levels and saturated fats, reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Due to its low sodium content, it is also good for people with high blood pressure.

Lowers Cholesterol Level

Using tofu as an alternative to the animal protein can help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. As compared to meats such as beef, tofu has lower levels of saturated fatty acids and higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids. It is also a good source of lecithin and linoleic acid, which helps regulate the metabolism.

Manages Weight

A study suggests that soy-based low-calorie diets have a beneficial effect on reduction of weight and blood lipids.

Eases Menopause Symptoms

The organic compounds in tofu, namely isoflavones, help to manage the symptoms of menopause. Isoflavones are plant-based compounds that mimic the estrogen hormone. Tofu can help stabilize the estrogen levels during menopause and also provide relief from hot flashes.

Ageing

Another benefit of eating tofu regularly is that it slows down the ageing process considerably. Tofu helps retain the elasticity of the skin and tones the facial muscles

Hair loss

The human hair is primarily made of a protein called keratin. By eating tofu, your hair gets the required protein to produce more hair and keep the existing ones healthy. 

 
 
 
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30 healthy avocado recipes

Avocado healthy recipes

Time to share some healthy avocado recipes. Do you like avocados?

According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, one serving (one-fifth of an avocado, approximately 40 grams) contains:

  • 64 calories
  • almost 6 grams of fat
  • 3.4 grams of carbohydrate
  • less than a gram of sugar
  • almost 3 grams of fiber

Avocados are a great source of vitamins C, E, K, and B-6, as well as riboflavin, niacin, folate, pantothenic acid, magnesium, and potassium. They also provide lutein, beta-carotene, and omega-3 fatty acids.

Heart health, Lower Cholesterol and Triglyceride Levels

Again, avocado is a high fat food. But they don’t just contain any fat… the majority of the fat in avocado is oleic acid. This is a monounsaturated fatty acid. Oleic acid has been linked to reduced inflammation. Avocados may help protect against heart disease and diabetes.

Avocados can:

  • Reduce total cholesterol levels significantly.
  • Reduce blood triglycerides by up to 20%.
  • Lower LDL cholesterol by up to 22%.
  • Increase HDL (the “good”) cholesterol by up to 11%.

Osteoporosis prevention

 

Improved digestion

Despite its creamy texture, an avocado is actually high in fiber.

Eating foods with natural fiber can help prevent constipation, maintain a healthy digestive tract, and lower the risk of colon cancer.

Antimicrobial action

Avocados contain substances that have antimicrobial activity, particularly against Escherichia coli, a leading cause of food poisoning.

Help You Lose Weight

Including avocados in your diet could help you naturally eat fewer calories and have an easier time sticking to a healthy diet. Adding avocados to meals makes people more satiated (full) and reduces the desire to eat for many hours, compared to a similar meal without avocados. Avocados are high in fiber, and very low in carbs, two attributes that should also help promote weight loss.

 
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30 healthy lamb recipes

Lamb healthy recipes

Lamb is richer in iron than chicken or fish. Being rich in high-quality protein and many vitamins and minerals, lamb can be an excellent component of a healthy diet.

The protein content of lean, cooked lamb is usually 25-26%. The fat content may range from 17-21%. Contains slightly higher levels of saturated fat than beef and pork. Lamb is a rich source of Vitamin B12, Selenium, Zinc, Niacin and Phosphorus.

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