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30 healthy lamb recipes

Lamb healthy recipes

Here you´ll find 30 healthy lamb recipes. If you’re going to eat meat, it’s probably one of the most naturally reared animals. The vast majority of lambs will have been reared on grass.

Lamb does fall into the red meat category. Red meats have a high myoglobin content, which is a protein found in muscle that changes to red when it’s mixed with oxygen. As a red meat, lamb inherently contains more zinc and iron than non-red meats.

Lamb is richer in iron than chicken or fish. Being rich in high-quality protein and many vitamins and minerals, lamb can be an excellent component of a healthy diet.

One ounce of regular lamb (not grass-fed) has the same number of calories as grass-fed beef but actually has more health-promoting omega 3 fatty acids. People also get worried about lamb’s fat content, but lamb actually can have less marbling of fat within the meat compared to beef. Most of lamb meat’s fat is around the outside and can easily be trimmed.

Source of Complete Protein

Lamb isextremely rich in protein, and depending on the cut it contains anywhere between 25 – 30 grams per 100 grams.

Lamb contains every amino acid, this means that our body can use lamb protein more efficiently.

Protein is incredibly important for our health, and it encourages lean muscle mass, the growth and repair of cells, and higher levels of satiety.

Fights Anemia

Many different foods contain iron and it is present in everything from spinach and kale to bananas and tomatoes.

However, just as the digestibility of protein differs, not all iron is made the same. When it comes to digestion and absorption, heme iron is king.

We can absorb approximately 15-35% of heme iron (found in animal foods), but this absorption rate drops to 10-15% for non-heme sources of iron (plant foods).

Lamb contains a rich source of heme iron in amounts similar to other red meat.

Boost muscular endurance, strength, and muscle mass

Creatine will be well known to anyone with interest in working out and/or sporting performance. Markedly, creatine can help to boost muscular endurance, strength, and muscle mass.

Red meat is the most substantial dietary source of creatine and lamb contains approximately 300-500 mg per 100 grams.

Lamb also contains an amino acid called beta-alanine, which the body uses to produce carnosine, a substance that is important for muscle function. High levels of carnosine in human muscles have been associated with decreased fatigue and improved exercise performance.

Anti-inflammatory

Lamb does contain fat, but a significant portion of that fat is anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids. In fact, most pieces of lamb contain even more omega-3s than beef. Many people are aware of the many benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, but not too many realize that lamb meat is a noteworthy source of these healthy fatty acids.

Inmune System Booster

Lamb is also loaded with immune-boosting zinc. This nutrient can be found in cells throughout our bodies, and it’s absolutely essential to optimal immune health, along with wound healing, DNA and protein synthesis, as well as growth and development in children.

When it comes to immune health, if you don’t get enough zinc on a regular basis, your immune system is not going to function as it should, which means you’re more likely to have all kinds of health problems ranging from the common cold to more serious infections like pneumonia.

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30 healthy egg recipes

Egg healthy recipes

Here you´ll find 30 healthy egg recipes. Who doesn´t love eggs? They are a very good source of inexpensive, high-quality protein. More than half the protein of an egg is found in the egg white along with vitamin B2.

The whites contain vitamin D, B6, B12, selenium, zinc, iron, and copper.

A study published in Paediatrics magazine has suggested that giving young children just one egg a day for six months, alongside a diet with reduced sugar-sweetened foods, may help them achieve a healthy height and prevent stunting.

Raise HDL (The “Good”) Cholesterol

HDL stands for high-density lipoprotein. It is often known as the “good” cholesterol.

People who have higher levels of HDL usually have a lower risk of heart disease, stroke and other health problems.

Eating eggs is a great way to increase HDL. In one study, eating two eggs per day for six weeks increased HDL levels by 10%.

It is true that eggs are high in cholesterol. A single egg contains 212 mg, which is over half of the recommended daily intake of 300 mg.

However, it’s important to keep in mind that cholesterol in the diet doesn’t necessarily raise cholesterol in the blood.

The liver actually produces large amounts of cholesterol every single day. When you increase your intake of dietary cholesterol, your liver simply produces less cholesterol to even it out.

Nevertheless, the response to eating eggs varies between individuals:

  • In 70% of people, eggs don’t raise cholesterol at all
  • In the other 30% (termed “hyper responders”), eggs can mildly raise total and LDL cholesterol

Major Benefits for Eye Health

Egg yolks contain large amounts of both lutein and zeaxanthin, powerful antioxidants that accumulate in the retina of the eye.

Studies show that consuming adequate amounts of these nutrients can significantly reduce the risk of cataracts and macular degeneration, two very common eye disorders.

In one controlled study, eating just 1.3 egg yolks per day for 4.5 weeks increased blood levels of lutein by 28–50% and zeaxanthin by 114–142%.

Eggs are also high in vitamin A. Vitamin A deficiency is the most common cause of blindness in the world.

Lower Triglycerides

Eggs from hens that were raised on pasture and/or fed omega-3 enriched feeds tend to be much higher in omega-3 fatty acids.

Omega-3 fatty acids are known to reduce blood levels of triglycerides, a well known risk factor for heart disease.

Studies show that consuming omega-3 enriched eggs is a very effective way to lower blood triglycerides. In one study, eating just five omega-3 enriched eggs per week for three weeks reduced triglycerides by 16–18%.

High in Quality Protein

Eggs are an excellent source of protein, with a single large egg containing six grams of it.

Eggs also contain all the essential amino acids in the right ratios, so your body is well-equipped to make full use of the protein in them.

Eating enough protein can help with weight loss, increase muscle mass, lower blood pressure and optimize bone health, to name a few.

Help You Lose Weight

Eggs are incredibly filling. They are a high-protein food, and protein is, by far, the most satiating macronutrient.

Eggs score high on a scale called the satiety index, which measures the ability of foods to cause feelings of fullness and reduce later calorie intake.

In one study of 30 overweight women, eating eggs instead of bagels for breakfast increased feelings of fullness and made them automatically eat fewer calories for the next 36 hours.

In another study, replacing a bagel breakfast with an egg breakfast caused significant weight loss over a period of eight weeks