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3 Things You Need To Know About Hip Bursitis

hip bursitis

Hip bursitis – or “trochanteric bursitis” as it’s known in the medical community – is a condition that occurs when small sacs of fluid in the hip joint become inflamed.

hip bursitis

(Image credit: Pexels)

The word “bursitis” comes from bursa – small sacs that sit in the hip joint and allow muscles and tendons to glide over each other smoothly. Evolution baked bursas into our bodies a long time ago to prevent rubbing of internal structures and to give us the freedom to move continually, all day long.

Unfortunately, bursas can become inflamed following excessive exercise and strain, especially those in the hip joint. Trochanteric bursitis is a particular form of the condition where bursas in the region of the trochanter become inflamed. Many middle-aged women who experience hip pain are usually suffering from some form of irritation of this part of the hip bone. You can have inflammation in other bursas of the hip joint, but those around the trochanter appear to be the most naturally disadvantaged.

The following are three things that you need to know about hip bursitis.

#1: The Pain Hip Bursitis Creates Come From Inflammation

The symptoms of hip bursitis are varied, but all relate to pain. People with the condition typically feel pain on the outside of the hip or thigh which worsens during exercise. In some cases, the hip can feel sore to the touch, or when sleeping on the affected side. Typically, the pain worsens at night and can lead to knock-on effects, like insomnia.

The pain of hip bursitis comes from inflammation, the process by which the body responds to a perceived injury. Inflammatory factors rush to the site, causing painful internal swelling and pressure on the surrounding tissue. The purpose of the pain is to prevent you from using your hip joint while the body carries out repair work on the affected site, but that can lead to distress and an inability to do exercise.

#2: Hip Bursitis Has Many Causes

There are several different ways that a person can end up with hip bursitis,” according to Dr Lucas MD.

One of the leading causes of hip bursitis is obesity. When a person becomes severely overweight, the excess weight puts a strain on the hip joint, leading to higher pressure on the interface between tendons and muscles, damaging the protective bursa sacs.

Surgery can also increase the chance of developing the condition. Around five to twenty percent of people who undergo hip surgery experience some form of hip bursitis in the years following. Researchers think that this happens because hip surgery leads different length legs, which over time, put excessive pressure on one hip joint, putting it at a mechanical disadvantage.

Other causes of hip bursitis include poor postures and trauma. People who experience serious hip injuries, for instance, in a vehicle accident, often damage their bursas and go on to develop bursitis.

 

(Image credit: Pexels)

Another leading cause of the condition is performing activities that involve repetitive motion, such as household chores, specific actions at work, or exercise. Repeatedly performing the same operations over and over again can damage the bursa sacs and lead to painful inflammation and injury.

#3: Treatment Of Hip Bursitis Involves Drugs, Physical Therapy And Rest

Treating hip bursitis is complex with a range of therapies on offer.

If you go to your physician about possible hip bursitis, the first thing they’ll recommend is rest. By resting the affected area, you give it time for inflammation to go down and for the site to heal. Doctors may also recommend that you take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory pain medications, such as ibuprofen.

Physicians may then refer those with severe hip bursitis to a physiotherapist. The purpose of the physiotherapist is to help the patient strengthen the joints and muscles in the hip to prevent undue strain on the bursas. Some hip injuries can be the result of a lack of strength in the surrounding tissue.

For people who continue to experience substantial discomfort or difficulty sleeping, doctors may prescribe corticosteroid injections, a type of injection designed to reduce inflammation in the hip directly.

Unfortunately, some people continue to experience pain even after several interventions and many weeks of physio, especially if a mechanical issue is driving the condition. Doctors will often recommend surgery if conditions do not improve with home-treatment over twelve months. Surgery involves either adjusting the hip joint or removing the bursas if nothing can be done to reduce the inflammation.

Overall, hip bursitis is a painful condition. For most people, over-the-counter treatment methods are effective, but for some, the problem doesn’t go away. If you think that you might have hip bursitis, speak with your physician.

Dr Lucas MD

Dr Lucas MD

It is my mission to determine the best strategies to help you accelerate your recovery from injury, prevent chronic disease, and invigorate your musculoskeletal health and fitness.

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Dirty dog

The dirty dog involves your abs, butt, and hips. It´s a great exercise to prepare the body for activity.

Come to a hands and knees position. Engage your abs. Keep your spine in a neutral position; avoid any excessive sagging or arching. Pull the shoulder blades toward your hips.
Exhale. Keeping the knee bent, slowly lift the knee outwards and upwards toward the side. Try to move the leg without causing movement in your torso. Hold this position briefly, while keeping a stable torso and head level with your spine.
Inhale and slowly lower your knee back to the floor.
Repeat and switch legs.


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Side Leg Swings

This exercise warms up and stretches the hip flexors, hip extensors, hip adductors, and hip abductors.

Facing a wall or other support, brace the body with both arms outstretched at shoulder level. Stand upright, keeping the back straight. Keep the body stable and balanced. A slight forward lean is okay during Side Leg Swings, but avoid bending forward at the waist or rounding the back.

Swing one leg to the side of the body, extending to a comfortable height.

Swing the leg back, crossing in front of the body.

Increase the range of motion gradually until reaching the maximum comfortable height.

Swing the legs fluidly without bouncy or jerky actions.

While both legs should be fairly straight, the knees shouldn’t be locked.


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Dynamic seated Butterfly stretch

The butterfly stretch is one of the simplest stretches and works on your inner thighs, hips, and groin. It improves your flexibility for a variety of motion sports.

Sit on the floor or mat with your legs folded in front of you in a diamond shape with the soles of your feet together. Sit as upright and tall as possible, engage your abs stabilizing your spine. Keep your head aligned. Place your hands on the top of your feet.

In a controlled and fluid motion, move the legs slightly inward and toward each other and then contract the outside of the thighs to press the legs down back towards the floor, stretching through the inner thighs.

Continue this closing and opening of the legs about 12-15 reps.


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Kneeling Hip-flexor Stretch

Your hip flexors are located on your upper thighs just below your hipbones. These muscles allow you to bend at the waist and to lift your knees. Stretching your hip flexors prevents both hip and lower back pain.

From a kneeling position, bring the left foot forward making sure that the left knee is over the ankle and the hip is bent about 90 degrees. Place both hands gently on the left thigh to help maintain a straight, tall spine.

Pull your shoulders blades down and back. Engage your abs to brace your spine. Keep your pelvis stable. (Do not allow one side to shift higher or lower than the other side). Lean forward into your left hip while keeping your right knee pressed into the ground.

Hold the stretch position. Complete on one side before alternating to the other hip.


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