Posted on

30 Tofu healthy recipes

Tofu has gained popularity over the years especially as a vegetarian and vegan approved source of protein. Tofu is made by curdling soy milk and then pressing the resulting curds into soft, white blocks. The process of making tofu is relatively similar to the way that cheese is made from milk. Tofu nutrition is impressive, and that’s why many people assume it’s such a great health food. Per serving, it’s low in fat and calories yet high in protein, amino acids, iron, and calcium.
The negative part of this story is that soy is actually one of the most commonly genetically modified foods in the world, and tofu is made from soybeans, water, and a coagulant, or curdling agent. The vast majority of soy consumed in the U.S. comes from a highly processed form of soy. The soybeans have usually been genetically engineered, cracked, dehulled, crushed, and subjected to solvent extraction to separate their oils from the rest of the bean.
Having said that, here´s the link to the public notebook, where you´ll find the notes for all the recipes, which will allow you to work without distractions: just a pic, lists of ingredients and easy to follow instructions to get them done. Not an Evernote user yet? Create your account, here.
30tofurecipes
However, if you want to visit the original articles, this is the list.

*This post contains affiliate links.

Posted on

Study finds: Strength and hypertrophy adaptations between low- vs. high-load resistance training

Schoenfeld, BJ, Grgic, J, Ogborn, D, and Krieger, J, have reviewed the current body of literature and a meta-analysis to compare changes in strength and hypertrophy between low- vs. high-load resistance training protocols. A total of 21 studies were ultimately included for analysis that met the following criteria:

  1. an experimental trial involving both low-load training [≤60% 1 repetition maximum (1RM)] and high-load training (>60% 1RM);
  2. with all sets of the training protocols being performed to momentary muscular failure;
  3. at least one method of estimating changes in muscle mass or dynamic, isometric, or isokinetic strength was used;
  4. the training protocol lasted for a minimum of 6 weeks;
  5. the study involved participants with no known medical conditions or injuries impairing training capacity.

Gains in 1RM strength were significantly greater in favor of high-load vs. low-load training, whereas no significant differences were found for isometric strength between conditions.

Changes in measures of muscle hypertrophy were similar between conditions.
The findings indicate that maximal strength benefits are obtained from the use of heavy loads while muscle hypertrophy can be equally achieved across a spectrum of loading ranges.

You can find the full article (PDF) here.

Posted on

Barbell Deadlift

The deadlift is an excellent compound exercise that targets the quads, hamstrings, gluteal muscles, lower back, traps, and forearms. If it´s not done properly, you can seriously injure yourself (such as a herniated disc).

Place the barbell on the ground in front of you and add plates according to your strength and fitness level. Beginners usually start lifting just the barbell, since a typical barbell weighs between 25 and 45 pounds on its own.

  1. With your feet shoulder-width apart, your toes pointing forward or slightly outward, and the barbell is at the midpoint of your feet.
  2. Bend your knees and hips and sit back as if you were going to sit, while you reach down to grab the barbell with hands shoulder-width apart.
  3. Grip the bar with both palms facing you. This is the normal or double overhand grip. You can use the mixed grip later when you can’t hold it with a normal grip.
  4. Push your knees out; don’t let them collapse in. Keep your back straight. Bend from the hips rather than from your waist. This is the starting position.
  5. Always make sure your back is completely flat and straight. If there is any kind of bend in your back, you need to do some flexibility work before deadlifting.
  6. Begin the movement by pushing through your heels and straightening your knees. Engage your hamstrings and glutes to pull the bar up.
  7. Raise your hips and shoulders at the same rate while maintaining your back straight. Keep your abs tight during the whole lift. The bar should drag along your shins on the way up.
  8. Come to a standing position with upright posture and your shoulders pulled back, don’t let your shoulders cave forward. Don’t bend backward at all, just stand up straight.
  9. Keeping your back straight, return the bar to the starting position in a controlled manner. Push your butt out as if you are going to sit down in a chair. Do not arch your back.
  10. Repeat until completing the prescribed number of repetitions.
Posted on

Weider´s training principles: The progressive overload principle

Joe Weider (November 29, 1919 – March 23, 2013) was a Canadian bodybuilder and entrepreneur who co-founded the International Federation of BodyBuilders (IFBB) alongside his brother Ben. He was also the creator of the Mr. Olympia, the Ms. Olympia and the Masters Olympia bodybuilding contests.
Joe Weider
Joe’s most indelible addition to the science and sport of bodybuilding is the Weider Principles: over 30 theories and techniques that forever changed the means by which someone could build a strong, muscular body.

The progressive overload principle

To increase any aspect of physical fitness (muscle mass, strength, stamina, etc.), your muscles need to be continually put under increased stress.
Today, I want to focus on muscle mass, to keep it simple for beginners. To achieve more muscle mass, the number of sets is key.
In the early years of bodybuilding, most experts believed that to increase muscle mass, we should only complete one set of each exercise per workout. If the whole body is to complete twelve exercises, this would mean twelve sets per workout.
Weider saw it differently. He was the first to recommend working out using several sets of one exercise (3-5 sets per exercise) to exhaust each muscle group and to stimulate maximum muscle growth.
Start with three sets of each exercise and continue increasing the number of sets until you make five. This strategy will also help you increase your muscle strength gradually without obsessing with the weight you lift. It´s no magic, it´s the progressive overload principle: once your muscles are used to perform three sets, you have to push them to do four sets and then five.
When you are able to do five series with the same weight with which it was hard to do three series the first week, it is time to add more weight.
I know that most bodybuilders speak wonders and encourage you to lift heavy, and so do I, but in due time. The word “heavy” means “difficult to lift or move” and this is a different weight to each person. Whatever is difficult to lift today for you, it will be easier to lift next month.
First, progress from 3 to 5 sets. Then progress to heavier weights.
The progressive overload principle is the core of all physical training and forms a solid basis for successful training.
Posted on

Fitness Advice #1 Start Now

Yesterday you said tomorrow

As the New Year approaches, many of you may be writing your New Year´s Resolutions yet. Chances that “get in shape” appears on your list are high. And that´s ok, but let me tell you: about 80% of you will fail. I don´t want to discourage you, but it is what it is.
So, the first and best advice I can give you is this: Start today!
You feel motivated right now and you think this motivation will keep growing and growing, leading you to start exercising soon. Well, it may happen, but my experience (and January´s abandon rate) tells me you have more possibilities to win the lotto.
Motivation sucks because it´s never there when you need it. The moment you have an instinct to act on a goal, apply the 5-seconds rule. In this video, Mel Robbins explains how we all sabotage ourselves, and how we can stop doing it.
Do not wait until New Year, do not wait until next week, do not wait until tomorrow. Whether it is winning a race, losing weight, gaining flexibility, looking good in a bathing suit, or living a long life, start small and work your way up to a better and better you. Please, don´t fool yourself waiting for the perfect moment to start chasing your dreams. There is no perfect moment to start anything other than right now!
Do not wait one more second: go to the gym and get that membership, or buy that pair of dumbbells you need to train at home or the pair of running shoes you need… It doesn´t matter what your specific goal is, today is the right moment for you to start chasing it. No excuses, no overthinking… Just do it.
The toughest part is yet to be: keep going. Rome wasn´t built in a day. A warm day does not make summer. And let me tell you that after your first day working out, you´ll feel proud. But also soreness, tired, and many days from this first day you won´t feel like training. Those who workout on a regular basis know I´m telling the truth. We all feel like that one day (or week) or another! Remember the 5 seconds rule, kick your excuses out of your head and do what you have to do, keep going. A regular (serious) training plan is usually set for 6-8 weeks. On this journey you´ll have good and bad days, great and terrible days, they´re all part of the process.
At this point, you already know that online training is a “thing”. We´ll work together using Evernote, the best app in the market to set goals, track progress, and get things done. That´s what fitness is about, right? Set goals, get things done, and progress towards your dreamed body.
I would love to help you achieve your fitness goals, whatever they are: lose weight, gain muscle, overcome a plateau, running a 5k or a marathon… You name it, I´m an old dog with years of experience and tons of tricks in my sleeve to get you where you want to be. Feel free to check my services, and if you think you need a custom training and meal plan, and I could help you, sign up. The first week is free if you create your Evernote account using my referral link. This way you make sure I´m the right trainer for you without worrying about the money.

“Example, whether it be good or bad, has a powerful influence”. George Washington

Following Washington´s advice, I want to invite you to join my own fitness journey. Yes, it starts today! Just click the “add to calendar” button in the sidebar and you´ll get my daily workout straight on your calendar.

calendar1

Then, you can reschedule as best fits your own schedule. Easy, right?

calendar2

I have not trained for a long time and these workouts will be suitable for all those who want to start lifting and getting fit. We will progress together, week by week. As an incentive, there will be special offers, gifts, and surprises for those who join. All this will appear only in the notes, in due time. Of course, I am at your disposal to answer any questions and help you get the most out of these workouts.

Just one last thing: Happy Sweating!!