Posted on 10 Comments

Barbell Deadlift

The deadlift is an excellent compound exercise that targets the quads, hamstrings, gluteal muscles, lower back, traps, and forearms. If it´s not done properly, you can seriously injure yourself (such as a herniated disc).

Place the barbell on the ground in front of you and add plates according to your strength and fitness level. Beginners usually start lifting just the barbell, since a typical barbell weighs between 25 and 45 pounds on its own.

  1. With your feet shoulder-width apart, your toes pointing forward or slightly outward, and the barbell is at the midpoint of your feet.
  2. Bend your knees and hips and sit back as if you were going to sit, while you reach down to grab the barbell with hands shoulder-width apart.
  3. Grip the bar with both palms facing you. This is the normal or double overhand grip. You can use the mixed grip later when you can’t hold it with a normal grip.
  4. Push your knees out; don’t let them collapse in. Keep your back straight. Bend from the hips rather than from your waist. This is the starting position.
  5. Always make sure your back is completely flat and straight. If there is any kind of bend in your back, you need to do some flexibility work before deadlifting.
  6. Begin the movement by pushing through your heels and straightening your knees. Engage your hamstrings and glutes to pull the bar up.
  7. Raise your hips and shoulders at the same rate while maintaining your back straight. Keep your abs tight during the whole lift. The bar should drag along your shins on the way up.
  8. Come to a standing position with upright posture and your shoulders pulled back, don’t let your shoulders cave forward. Don’t bend backward at all, just stand up straight.
  9. Keeping your back straight, return the bar to the starting position in a controlled manner. Push your butt out as if you are going to sit down in a chair. Do not arch your back.
  10. Repeat until completing the prescribed number of repetitions.


Do you want to watch more exercise videos? Subscribe to my YouTube channel.

Posted on 4 Comments

Deadlift

Stand with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width, with your toes pointed forward or slightly outward and your feet so that the balls of your feet are lined up under the bar.

Squat down and firmly grasp the bar just outside of the knees using a closed, alternating grip. Thumbs should be wrapped around the bar with one hand facing up, the other hand facing down.

Keep your spine in neutral position. Your shoulders should pull down your back. Keep your chest lifted and your head in line with your spine or chin slightly lifted. Your heels are on the floor and your shoulders are over or slightly in front of the bar. Your gaze should be facing straight ahead or slightly upward.

Before lifting, engage your abs to protect your spine. Straighten your knees and hips at the same time, bringing the bar off the floor and coming to a full standing position. You are pushing your feet down into the floor as you return to a full standing position. The barbell will rest against the front of your thighs with your arms straight, and shoulders pulled down and back. Your goal is to keep the bar close to your body as it moves upward.

Your hips and knees bend simultaneously. As you lower your hips the knees bend and will start to shift forward slowly. Try to prevent your knees from traveling forward past the toes. Keep the abs engaged and keep your back flat.

Lower the hips and shoulders together. Do not allow the spine to round. Keep the back long and shoulder blades pulling down. Imagine holding a pencil between your shoulder blades throughout both phases of the movement.

The technique is very important in this lift. Two common mistakes are over arching the low back during the lifting and lowering phases and not raising and lowering the hips and shoulders together.

ADo you want to watch more exercise videos? Subscribe to my YouTube channel.

Posted on 14 Comments

Dumbbell Deadlift

The dumbbell deadlift builds strength in the lower body as well as the back, shoulders, and core, making it a great total-body exercise. By using dumbbell we’re able to achieve a greater range of motion. Starting with dumbbells can also be helpful when you’re learning the movement as they allow for lower total weight to be used.
Stand with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width, with your toes pointed forward or slightly outward. Grab one dumbbell with each hand, palms facing your body. Keep your spine in neutral position, your chest lifted and your head in line with your spine.
Brace your abs to stabilize your spine. The hips and shoulders should rise together. The objective is to keep the dumbbells close to your body as they move upward.
Inhale and hinge forward at your hips and shoulders together, bending the knees, lowering the dumbbells to the ground without allowing your back to round. Brace core and lift back to the starting position.
Exhale and lift back to the starting position, straighten your knees and hips to come to a full standing position with your elbows straight and the dumbbells resting against the sides of your thighs. The hips and shoulders should rise together. The objective is to keep the dumbbells close to your body as they move upward. Repeat.


Do you want to watch more exercise videos? Subscribe to my YouTube channel.