Built to last – Fitness Challenge – Day 10

Hello, do you realize you´re facing the last week? I knew you could do it!

Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. 
Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. 
It is our light, not our darkness
That most frightens us.

We ask ourselves
Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous?
Actually, who are you not to be? 
You are a child of God.

Your playing small 
Does not serve the world. 
There’s nothing enlightened about shrinking 
So that other people won’t feel insecure around you.

We are all meant to shine, 
As children do. 
We were born to make manifest 
The glory of God that is within us.

It’s not just in some of us; 
It’s in everyone.

And as we let our own light shine, 
We unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. 
As we’re liberated from our own fear, 
Our presence automatically liberates others.

Marianne Williamson

Pre-workout Talk:

  1. Perform each exercise for the prescribed amount of time, doing as many repetitions as possible.
  2. Watch the technique, a poor technique leads to injuries and we do not want that.
  3. Once you have completed one exercise, go to the next one.
  4. Complete this circuit three times.
  5. If you have questions, reach me at the Facebook group.

RECOMMENDATION: Use Evernote to track your workout. Here is the note corresponding to this workout.

Here is a playlist to help you maintain a high training pace.

Today we´re going to work our core, thighs, delts, lats, pecs, triceps, and biceps. This is the exercise list:

  1. Plank – 40 seconds
  2. Plank Twist – 40 seconds
  3. Glute Bridge – 40 seconds
  4. REST – 20 seconds
  5. Resistance Band Squat and press – 40 seconds
  6. Resistance Band Lateral Raise – 40 seconds
  7. REST – 20 seconds
  8. Bent Over Back Row – 40 seconds
  9. Standing Chest Press – 40 seconds
  10. REST – 20 seconds
  11. Triceps Pulldown – 40 seconds
  12. Resistance Band Standing Biceps Curl – 40 seconds
  13. REST – 20 seconds

Once you have finished the third round:

COOL-DOWN/STRETCHING

  1. Child pose – 40 seconds
  2. Lying Quad Stretch (left) – 40 seconds
  3. Lying Quad Stretch (right) – 40 seconds
  4. Figure 4 (left) – 40 seconds
  5. Figure 4 (right) – 40 seconds
  6. Standing Chest Stretch – 40 seconds
  7. Standing Triceps Stretch (left) – 40 seconds
  8. Standing Triceps Stretch (right) – 40 seconds
  9. Standing Biceps Stretch (left) – 40 seconds
  10. Standing Biceps Stretch (right) – 40 seconds

Eating to succeed

The suggested food for today was Eggs. What recipe have you prepared today? Take a picture of your plate and share it with us in the Facebook group.

For the next day, I suggest youCod. Read my blog about the cod health benefits.

Trainer Tips: #Fats

Are you afraid of fat? Don’t be. In addition to making food taste good, fat plays an important role in a healthy, balanced diet. Fat is crucial for life — so much so that our bodies figured out a way to make fat even if we eat almost no fat at all. Excess carbs and protein can both be converted into fat and stored as energy. Fat also helps our bodies function correctly in several ways.

At 9 calories per gram, fat is the most calorie-dense of the macronutrients (carbs and protein each have 4 grams). This makes sense since one of the biggest roles of fat is energy storage. For day-to-day activities — from sitting in front of your computer to walking the dog — fat is the main fuel our bodies burn for energy. Generally, during an activity where your heart rate is less than 70% of its maximal rate, fat serves as your body’s primary source of fuel.

Fat is found in a wide variety of foods — either naturally occurring or added fat during processing and cooking. Naturally occurring fats tend to be found in dairy, meat and fish, nuts and seeds, oil and fatty fruits (Think: olive oil and avocado). Added fats tend to be found in processed and packaged goods. Not all fats are created equal when it comes to health.

Saturated fat mostly comes from animal sources like meat, particularly red meat, and dairy. Certain plants and their oil are high in saturated fat, such as coconut and palm. Virtually all major health organizations advise us to eat less saturated fat since it raises LDL cholesterol, a risk factor for heart disease.

Trans fat is synthetically made by taking liquid unsaturated fat and blasting it with hydrogen so it resembles solid saturated fat. This makes foods more shelf stable, easier to cook with and allows manufacturers to replace saturated fat in their products. However, evidence has revealed trans fats are one of the worst things for your heart. Not only do trans fat increase LDL (bad) cholesterol, but they also decrease HDL (good) cholesterol.

Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat is what we think of when we say “healthy” fats because they don’t carry the same risk for heart disease as saturated and trans fat. Generally, found in high-fat, plant-based foods such as avocado, nuts, seeds, olives and fatty fish such as salmon, tuna and mackerel.

Omega-3 and Omega-6: While they’re technically polyunsaturated fats, the omegas deserve a separate call-out since our bodies cannot produce them and we must get these from the foods we eat. Both omega-6 and omega-3 fats play important roles in regulating our immune systems. Omega-3 fat plays an essential role in developing our vision and nervous systems.

Till Wednesday! Have fun!

Did you just find this challenge? Start from the beginning:

5 thoughts on “Built to last – Fitness Challenge – Day 10”

    1. If there is something that inspires and motivates in this life, it is poetry.
      Once your soul is nourished you can face any challenge 😊
      Big hugs, my friend!!

  1. I agree, you picked a great poem for inspiration and motivation David – Perfect! Day 10 DOWN! Yeah!! Thank you ever so much my friend. My muscles are wakin’ up with the new exercises! Hugs!

    1. Thank you!! It´s one of my favorite poems :D
      Only 2 workouts to go!! You´re killing it!!
      Big hugs back ;)

Your turn. What do you think about this?

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Rest 30 seconds

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Lower Back

The Erector Spinae is not just one muscle, but a bundle of muscles and tendons. Paired, they run more or less vertically. It extends throughout the lumbar, thoracic and cervical regions, and lies in the groove to the side of the vertebral column.

Latissimus Dorsi

The latissimus dorsi is the larger, flat, dorsolateral muscle on the trunk, posterior to the arm, and partly covered by the trapezius on its median dorsal region.

Deltoids

The Deltoid muscle is the muscle forming the rounded contour of the shoulder. It is divided into three portions, anterior, lateral and posterior, with the fibers having different roles due to their orientation.

Infraspinatus

The Infraspinatus muscle is one of the four rotator cuff muscles crossing the shoulder joint and is commonly injured. It is the main external rotator of the shoulder joint.

Biceps

The Biceps brachii is  actually two separate bundles of muscles (heads). The two heads of the Biceps vary in length and as a result, are called the Short and the Long Biceps heads.

Triceps

The Triceps Brachii muscles  have three muscle heads: Lateral, Medial and Long head. Primarily responsible for the extension of the elbow joint. The lateral head is used for movements requiring occasional high-intensity force, while the medial fascicle enables more precise, low-force movements.

Forearm
(Anterior muscles)

The Pronator teres pronates the forearm, turning the hand posteriorly. If the elbow is flexed to a right angle, then pronator teres will turn the hand so that the palm faces inferiorly. It is assisted in this action by pronator quadratus.

Forearm
(Posterior muscles)

The Extensor Digitorum muscle helps in the movements of the wrists and the elbows. It extends the phalanges, then the wrist, and finally the elbow. It acts principally on the proximal phalanges. It tends to separate the fingers as it extends them.

Pecs

The pectoralis major makes up the bulk of the chest muscles in the male and lies under the breast in the female.

The pectoralis minor is a thin, triangular muscle, situated at the upper part of the chest, beneath the pectoralis major. 

Abs

The Rectus Abdominis is the most superficial of the abdominal muscles. It is this muscle which forms the six-pack shape! It is a paired muscle running vertically on each side of the anterior wall of the abdomen. There are two parallel muscles, separated by a midline band of connective tissue called the linea alba.

Obliques

The External Oblique is situated on the lateral and anterior parts of the abdomen. It is broad, thin, and irregularly quadrilateral. It is the largest and the most superficial (outermost) of the three flat muscles of the lateral anterior abdomen. 

Glutes

The gluteal muscles are a group of three muscles which make up the buttocks: the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and gluteus minimus. The three muscles originate from the ilium and sacrum and insert on the femur. The functions of the muscles include extension, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation of the hip joint.

Rest 40 seconds

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Quadriceps

The Quadriceps Femoris is the knee extensor muscle.  As a group, the quadriceps femoris is crucial in walking, running, jumping and squatting. It´s subdivided into four separate “heads”.

Hamstrings

A hamstring is any one of the three posterior thigh muscles in between the hip and the knee (from medial to lateral: semimembranosus, semitendinosus and biceps femoris). The hamstrings are quite susceptible to injury.

Lower Leg

The gastrocnemius and the soleus form what we know as calf. They are involved in activities such as walking, running, jumping… 

Rest 120 seconds

0

Rest 90 seconds

0

Rest 60 seconds

0

Trapezius

The trapezius is a broad, flat and triangular muscle. The muscles on each side form a trapezoid shape. It is the most superficial of all the back muscles.

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