Affiliate Disclosure

This affiliate disclosure details affiliate relationships that chape.fitness has with other companies and products.
 
I use affiliate links on chape.fitness. This means that in some cases when we link to some other brand or online retailer we get a commission for referred sales. Meaning, if you click one of these affiliate links and make a purchase these brands or retailers give me a commission. For what it’s worth, I never write articles and insert affiliate links for the sole reason of earning a commission. If I link to any other site it’s because I legitimately believe their product can benefit readers. And if I earn a few bucks in the process all the better. Earned commissions go toward supporting this site.
 
So, in compliance with the FTC guidelines, please assume the following about all links, posts, photos and other material on this website:
  • Any/all of the links on chape.fitness are affiliate links of which I receive a small commission from sales of certain items, but the price is the same for you. As chape.fitness has grown, so have costs associated with running and maintaining it, and affiliate links are a way I help offset these costs.
  • If I post an affiliate link to a product, it is something that I personally use, support and would recommend without an affiliate link.
  • Unless otherwise noted, all reviews are of items I have purchased myself and I am not paid or compensated in any way.
  • My first priority is always providing valuable information and resources to help you create positive changes in your life and I will only ever link to products or resources (affiliate or otherwise) that fit within this purpose.

What is an Affiliate Link?

Many (but not all) of the links on chape.fitness are affiliate links. This means that a special tracking code is used and that I may make a small commission on the sale of an item if you purchase through one of these links. The price of the item is the same for you whether it is an affiliate link or not, and using affiliate links helps me to maintain this website and support my family.
 
In some cases, I may also use a link and provide a discount code for an item. In these cases, I may still earn an affiliate commission and the price may actually be LESS for you by using this link or tracking code.
 
Again, for simplicity, assume that any link on chape.fitness is an affiliate link and that I may/will make a commission if you purchase through these links (though the price remains the same for you).
 
If you are going to purchase a product and would like to help support the chape.fitness mission (which I would be very grateful for!), links to many of the products I recommend can be found on the resources page.

When Do I Use Affiliate Links?

If I post an affiliate link to a product, it is something that I personally use, support and would recommend without an affiliate link. Unless noted otherwise, any product I link to is one I have purchased and use. I do not accept free products for review and also disclose if I am affiliated with a company in any other way that benefits me financially. 
 
My first priority is always providing resources to help you create positive changes in your life, and I will only ever link to products or resources (affiliate or otherwise) that fit within this purpose.

Nature of Affiliate Relationships

Please note that while I personally purchase, review and use every product I link to, these products are purchased from third party companies and I do not control these companies or have a financial interest other than an affiliate relationship unless otherwise disclosed.
 
For this reason, I cannot ensure that any item purchased through a link on chape.fitness is shipped on time, packaged properly, or that you will like it. Any problems or concerns with a specific product purchased through a link on this website should be directed to the company the item was purchased from.

Copyright and Rights Reserved

All of the information on this website, including images, text, audio, video, and other forms of content (including the information in this affiliate disclosure) is Copyright © chape.fitness 2018 and may not be downloaded, reproduced, republished or otherwise copied without express written permission of the author and of chape.fitness.
 
The Website and all of its Content and the selection and arrangement thereof, is protected as a compilation owned by chape.fitness under the copyright laws of Spain and other countries. chape.fitness may change the Website or delete any content, features, or services at any time, in any way, for any or no reason. chape.fitness reserves all rights not expressly granted in and to the Website and the Content.

Lower Leg

The gastrocnemius and the soleus form what we know as calf. They are involved in activities such as walking, running, jumping… 

Hamstrings

A hamstring is any one of the three posterior thigh muscles in between the hip and the knee (from medial to lateral: semimembranosus, semitendinosus and biceps femoris). The hamstrings are quite susceptible to injury.

Quadriceps

The Quadriceps Femoris is the knee extensor muscle.  As a group, the quadriceps femoris is crucial in walking, running, jumping and squatting. It´s subdivided into four separate “heads”.

Glutes

The gluteal muscles are a group of three muscles which make up the buttocks: the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and gluteus minimus. The three muscles originate from the ilium and sacrum and insert on the femur. The functions of the muscles include extension, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation of the hip joint.

Lower Back

The Erector Spinae is not just one muscle, but a bundle of muscles and tendons. Paired, they run more or less vertically. It extends throughout the lumbar, thoracic and cervical regions, and lies in the groove to the side of the vertebral column.

Obliques

The External Oblique is situated on the lateral and anterior parts of the abdomen. It is broad, thin, and irregularly quadrilateral. It is the largest and the most superficial (outermost) of the three flat muscles of the lateral anterior abdomen. 

Abs

The Rectus Abdominis is the most superficial of the abdominal muscles. It is this muscle which forms the six-pack shape! It is a paired muscle running vertically on each side of the anterior wall of the abdomen. There are two parallel muscles, separated by a midline band of connective tissue called the linea alba.

Pecs

The pectoralis major makes up the bulk of the chest muscles in the male and lies under the breast in the female.

The pectoralis minor is a thin, triangular muscle, situated at the upper part of the chest, beneath the pectoralis major. 

Forearm
(Posterior muscles)

The Extensor Digitorum muscle helps in the movements of the wrists and the elbows. It extends the phalanges, then the wrist, and finally the elbow. It acts principally on the proximal phalanges. It tends to separate the fingers as it extends them.

Forearm
(Anterior muscles)

The Pronator teres pronates the forearm, turning the hand posteriorly. If the elbow is flexed to a right angle, then pronator teres will turn the hand so that the palm faces inferiorly. It is assisted in this action by pronator quadratus.

Triceps

The Triceps Brachii muscles  have three muscle heads: Lateral, Medial and Long head. Primarily responsible for the extension of the elbow joint. The lateral head is used for movements requiring occasional high-intensity force, while the medial fascicle enables more precise, low-force movements.

Biceps

The Biceps brachii is  actually two separate bundles of muscles (heads). The two heads of the Biceps vary in length and as a result, are called the Short and the Long Biceps heads.

Infraspinatus

The Infraspinatus muscle is one of the four rotator cuff muscles crossing the shoulder joint and is commonly injured. It is the main external rotator of the shoulder joint.

Deltoids

The Deltoid muscle is the muscle forming the rounded contour of the shoulder. It is divided into three portions, anterior, lateral and posterior, with the fibers having different roles due to their orientation.

Latissimus Dorsi

The latissimus dorsi is the larger, flat, dorsolateral muscle on the trunk, posterior to the arm, and partly covered by the trapezius on its median dorsal region.

Trapezius

The trapezius is a broad, flat and triangular muscle. The muscles on each side form a trapezoid shape. It is the most superficial of all the back muscles.